Sunday, April 24, 2016

Abandonment Issues: Small Arms Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Co-written by Jerm & Ninja IX

It has been a while, but we're back with a BANG! Quite literally.

Yesterday, we found ourselves standing at the foot of Lake Ontario in Mississauga, on a plot known as the Arsenal Lands.

With nothing left standing of the original Arsenal Lands complex but the historic water tower and the Small Arms Inspection Building, we approached the building first, jerm and ninja, with our dear friends terapr0 and tash.0.

img_smallArmsProject-01
(Photo found online)

Small Munitions Inspection Building

The Arsenal Lands are steeped in wartime history, we discussed...

Colonel Samuel Smith owned the property dating back to 1806 when he was a Queen's Ranger during the Revolutionary War. In 1910 it was converted for military purposes and became known as "The Toronto Barracks Site." And then of course during World War II the large munitions plant was built on the site.

According to the City of Mississauga's website...

"The complex included a 212,000 square foot plant and the 81,000 square foot rifle inspection centre, and was erected by the government in 1940. The plant continued to operate until 1974 supplying military arms and other machinery. Ontario Hydro (now Ontario Power Generation) and the Cadet Organization Police School have used the building since."

The Small Arms Inspection Building, which was used for quality control, was designed by Allward & Gouinlock Architects. In 2008 the vacant building was under threat of demolition until the City of Mississauga declared it of cultural heritage value. The Toronto and Region Conservation (TRCA) has purchased the Arsenal Lands and is currently in the process of re-purposing the Small Arms Inspection Building to mixed use space for arts, culture, heritage and business purposes.

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Similar to the Bata Shoe and Gibbard Furniture factories, women either volunteered or were conscripted by the millions to work due to the shortage of men and thus played a key role in supporting the war effort from home by providing vital munitions to the front line. It was dirty and dangerous work where serious acid burns could occur and the women's skin turned yellow due to handling cordite or sulphur. The work was boring and repetitive but the slightest lapse in concentration could cause an explosive blast. On Remembrance Day in 2012, 1.5 million women were finally recognized for their tremendous efforts at the Cenotaph after decades of receiving little recognition for their service.

img_smallArmsProject-03
(Photo found online)

"My grandfather managed a munitions factory during WWII and was denied three times trying to enlist himself in the war. The army felt his efforts were best utilized at the factory.", ninja shared, as we made our way inside.

Inside, the wide open factory floor was bright and looked out onto a green scape with large trees casting shadows into the building, moving slowly across the edges of the floor as the sun crossed the sky. Void of the hustle and bustle of war-time production, silence and emptiness abounded.

As Jerm scurried like a mouse from room to room snapping these images and energetically commenting on the variety of colours throughout the building, Ninja interrupted pondering aloud about the lives of the women that worked here during such tumultuous times. That thought stayed with us both as we wandered the halls, the four of us poking in and out of each and every room like a Scoobie Doo bit. We even stopped here and there to have some photographic fun, posing creepily behind the foggy, dimpled glass windows in the office doors, light painting in the boiler room and even morphing into unicorn people.

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Casting shadows
(Photo by terapr0)

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection 
Building

Finally, after we finished up in the Small Arms Inspection Building, we sauntered carelessly through the field spotting hawks and other rare city birds toward the giant water tower spotted with graffiti written by people who are braver and more limber than we. Climbing a few steps up and looking up to the sky one can see where the rusted ladder juts out near the top platform, a death defying final vertical climb surrounded by nothing but sky and a momentary lapse of reason for those who take the challenge.

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Small Munitions Inspection Building

Exploring is always a therapeutic activity, we agree. A time to take risks, hone our survival skills and instincts, try something new, and of course learn something about a past life or historical time period that you can only try to imagine. Today we were fortunate enough to spend time with good friends as well, which only added to the memories created. Time now to go start packing our things preparing to move into our new home. Here's to even more adventures in the future, cheers.

click here to check out all of jerm & ninja IX's ABANDONMENT ISSUES